Guide Building the Christian Academy

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  1. Rooted Deep, Building Up Capital Campaign
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  3. Rooted Deep, Building Up Capital Campaign - Park Place Christian Academy
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Seeking to answer these questions, Arthur Holmes here explores the Christian tradition of learning, focusing on seven formative episodes in history that pertain to building and maintaining a strong Christian academy today. Holmes's fascinating treatment is set within the history of ideas - the early church in a pagan culture, Augustine's formative influence on monastery and cathedral schools, the rise and decline of scholasticism, Renaissance humanism's contribution to the Protestant Reformation, the utilitarian view of education that accompanied the scientific revolution, and struggles with Enlightenment secularization - and incorporates the educational thought of Plato and Isocrates, Clement and Origen, Abelard and Hugh of St.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published February 14th by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.

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Rooted Deep, Building Up Capital Campaign

Mar 12, Jacob Aitken rated it really liked it Shelves: aint-dutch-aint-much , beauty , church-history , education. As with most of Holmes' works, this book nicely integrated knowledge and virtue in light of a larger vision. Holmes identifies four key areas that constitute the "soul of Christian learning:" 1.

The usefulness of liberal arts as preparation for service to both church and society. The unity of truth 3. Contemplative or doxological learning 4. Indeed, such an approach will pursue Virtue: arete; overall excellence that actualizes human potential for a complete life in accordance with reason. Holmes then leads us on a tour of Christian pedagogy in history. With Augustine we pursue the highest good: not just chief among many goods, but the all-inclusive good that gives every other good its value The real teacher is the Logos.

We don't have to agree with Newman's ecclesiology, but we must appreciate his pedagogy. It is an integrally related system. Conclusion: Reading Holmes reveals why modern education is a complete disaster. We determine progress by quantifiable testing, yet the most important things in life are not reducible to quantification.

How do you quantify virtue? But no matter. Proof: both conservatives and liberals are waking up to this disaster. We forbid virtue and integrated systems because they resist quantification, yet we act surprised that "Johnny" not only can't read, but he can't do the right thing. Or anything.

To quote CS Lewis, "We castrate the gelding and bid him be fruitful. Dec 20, Christopher Rush rated it it was ok. This book, despite its grandiose language on the cover, is a bit disappointing. Holmes, no offense to him or his, has nothing new to say with this book. We've read it all, seen it all, heard it all already. The entire book, except for the last chapter, is a dull rehash of selections of church history with a modicum of educational elements sprinkled in almost haphazardly.

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I admit that sounds much harsher than this book deserves, but the book does not deliver on what it promises. The final sum This book, despite its grandiose language on the cover, is a bit disappointing. The final summative chapter has a few fine points: we should spend more time contemplating God and His wonderfulness even in academic settings more than adducing solutions to theological problems; we should have a curriculum that promotes leisure more than busywork; delight in beautiful things, etc. I applaud all of that The unity of truth 3. Contemplative or doxological learning 4. Indeed, such an approach will pursue Virtue: arete; overall excellence that actualizes human potential for a complete life in accordance with reason.

Holmes then leads us on a tour of Christian pedagogy in history. With Augustine we pursue the highest good: not just chief among many goods, but the all-inclusive good that gives every other good its value The real teacher is the Logos. We don't have to agree with Newman's ecclesiology, but we must appreciate his pedagogy.

It is an integrally related system. Conclusion: Reading Holmes reveals why modern education is a complete disaster. We determine progress by quantifiable testing, yet the most important things in life are not reducible to quantification.

Rooted Deep, Building Up Capital Campaign - Park Place Christian Academy

How do you quantify virtue? But no matter. Proof: both conservatives and liberals are waking up to this disaster. We forbid virtue and integrated systems because they resist quantification, yet we act surprised that "Johnny" not only can't read, but he can't do the right thing. Or anything.

WCA 2014: Building Christian Leaders

To quote CS Lewis, "We castrate the gelding and bid him be fruitful. Dec 20, Christopher Rush rated it it was ok. This book, despite its grandiose language on the cover, is a bit disappointing. Holmes, no offense to him or his, has nothing new to say with this book. We've read it all, seen it all, heard it all already. The entire book, except for the last chapter, is a dull rehash of selections of church history with a modicum of educational elements sprinkled in almost haphazardly. I admit that sounds much harsher than this book deserves, but the book does not deliver on what it promises.

The final sum This book, despite its grandiose language on the cover, is a bit disappointing.


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The final summative chapter has a few fine points: we should spend more time contemplating God and His wonderfulness even in academic settings more than adducing solutions to theological problems; we should have a curriculum that promotes leisure more than busywork; delight in beautiful things, etc. I applaud all of that This is one of those books that cites sources, and the effect is more akin to "why am I reading this instead of those better works?

Better yet, check out Dr. James V. May 15, Heather rated it liked it Shelves: education , history , philosophy. Condensing 2, years of Christian education into pages is a daunting goal, and one that must inevitably leave some gaps and thin spots.

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On the whole, Arthur F. Holmes has done an admirable job of creating a sweeping overview of the Christian academy throughout its history. In addition, his final chapter provides an honest assessment of current education and provides explicit, practical suggestions for action. That said, I'd still like to look for another book that approaches the history of Condensing 2, years of Christian education into pages is a daunting goal, and one that must inevitably leave some gaps and thin spots.

That said, I'd still like to look for another book that approaches the history of Christian education and thought from a different angle. Holmes's background in philosophy sometimes makes the text difficult for a reader who is unfamiliar with philosophical terms, and while he is usually objective, his Reformed leanings show in some places.

I struggled to grasp his insistence on Lutheran ideas as "nominalist," or his recurring mention of "doxological learning. There is much of worth, though, and if nothing else, the book provides some touchstones to help in developing a historical understanding of educational philosophy. Kyra rated it liked it Jan 19, Elizabeth Perkins rated it it was amazing Mar 03, Emmiefiggs rated it liked it Jan 22, Jennifer Sanders rated it really liked it Apr 04, Madison Brockman rated it really liked it Jun 29, Nathan Esbenshade rated it really liked it Jan 22, Gayle Fallon rated it really liked it Jul 25, Sam Koenen rated it really liked it Jan 12, Janie rated it really liked it Feb 07, Luke rated it liked it Mar 03, Ed Lang rated it really liked it Dec 02, Gregory rated it it was amazing Dec 17, Ian rated it really liked it Jan 29, Tabin Lyatosh rated it really liked it Oct 20, Elizabeth rated it liked it Dec 08, Maira Gaffar rated it it was ok May 06, Carlee Neumann rated it liked it Jul 15, Sam Cox rated it it was amazing Feb 01, Steve Spencer rated it liked it Mar 06, Brenton rated it really liked it Jan 15, Tom Golding rated it liked it Sep 16, Monica Mullins rated it it was amazing Oct 23, Jerry rated it liked it Nov 17, Gina rated it liked it Mar 01, Patrick marked it as to-read Jan 23, Rachel added it May 01, Pd added it May 26, Christa marked it as to-read Sep 02, Derek Halvorson marked it as to-read Aug 02, Dennis Williams added it Jan 17, Leanne marked it as to-read Mar 13, Andrew Goddard added it Apr 08, Tom Gourlay marked it as to-read Oct 29, Rachel Motte marked it as to-read Nov 13, Hannah Liss Thorn marked it as to-read Jul 25, Jarrod added it Sep 15,